The etiquette of business is the set of written and unwritten rules of conduct that make social interactions run more smoothly. Office etiquette in particular applies to coworker interaction, excluding interactions with external contacts such as customers and suppliers. When conducting group meetings in the United States, the assembly might follow Robert’s Rules of Order, if there are no other company policies to control a meeting.

These rules are often echoed throughout an industry or economy. For instance, 49% of employers surveyed in 2005 by the American National Association of Colleges and Employers found that non-traditional attire would be a “strong influence” on their opinion of a potential job candidate. Business Etiquette at companies such as IBM influence global business etiquette and professional standards.

Both office and business etiquette overlap considerably with basic tenets of netiquette, the social conventions for using computer networks.

Business etiquette can vary significantly in different countries, which is invariably related to their culture. For example: A notable difference between Chinese and Western business etiquette is conflict handling. Chinese businesses prefer to look upon relationship management to avoid conflicts – stemming from a culture that heavily relies on guanxi (personal connections) – while the west leaves resolution of conflict to the interpretations of law through contracts and lawyers.

In 2011, a group of etiquette experts and international business group formed a non-profit organization called IITTI to help human resource departments of multinationals in measuring the etiquette skills of prospective new employees during the recruitment process by standardizing image and etiquette examination, similar to what ISO does for industrial process measurements.

– Original article at wikipedia,org